David Linthicum

Learn to love legacy systems

David Linthicum

I’ve been corrected more than once. I’ve used the term “legacy system” in meetings and been quickly taken to the woodshed by the language police for saying something that was a clear pejorative. Even here I’ve started saying “traditional system” instead.

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How to stop people from causing bad cloud architectures

David Linthicum

I’ve been in some knock-down, drag-out battles over both the configuration and the use of technology. On one side, you have somebody with a very different opinion as to what technology should be used and how. On the other side, you know that you are right.

Machine learning operations don’t belong with cloudops

David Linthicum

It’s Monday morning, and after a long weekend of system trouble the cloud operations team is discussing what happened. It seems that several systems that were associated with a very advanced, new inventory management system enabled with machine learning had issues over the weekend.

Where did all the cloud computing thought leaders go?

David Linthicum

I’m not citing studies that demonstrate a diminished number of thought leaders in the cloud computing space—this is only my impression.

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An Adult Conversation About Estimates

Speaker: Beekey Cheung, Software Consultant, Professor Beekums, LLC

Estimates are a contentious topic in software development. Most of our development teams hate providing estimates and many managers are starting to view them as unnecessary. As senior software leaders, how can we determine whether estimates are helpful or harmful to our teams? We are excited to be joined by Beekey Cheung, a software consultant and blogger known as Professor Beekums, who has helped many leaders and teams go from fearing estimates to using them appropriately. He'll walk us through the value of estimates, how to overcome the hesitancy many have in giving them, and how to provide better estimates.

More reasons to put secure data in the public cloud

David Linthicum

The worldwide market for cloud intrusion protection software is projected to grow by $1.8 billion and have a compounded growth of 24.8 percent.

Your cloud-based application could be a profitable product

David Linthicum

In the world of application development, there is enterprise grade and product grade. If you’ve never heard those terms before, you’re not alone.

Taking enterprise databases to your cloud

David Linthicum

Databases are like cars. You have the vintage cars that everyone looks back on fondly, and now they cost 20 times what they did back in the 1970s.

For cloud support, enterprises should consider DIY

David Linthicum

I took my relatively new truck to a dealership this week to diagnose, and hopefully fix, a rubbing noise that occurs at random times. After a day at the shop, the truck came back with “no problem found.” And, of course, I heard the noise again on the way home.

Hybrid cloud is not what it used to be

David Linthicum

Back in the good old days when the cloud was cool, but nobody knew what it was, hybrid cloud was a pairing of public and private cloud. Indeed, hybrid cloud was popular because it allowed us to say we were moving to cloud computing while placing the majority of our cloud bets on private cloud.

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The Six Principles of Persuasion

Speaker: Michael Carducci, CTO, Mago:Tech

As senior tech leaders, we often fall prey to thinking that a “good idea” and logical case is sufficient to get the desired response and result. We might be trying to get our CEO on-board with investment in a new technology or a rearchitecture effort, or we might want culture or process changes by our team. Our “good idea” is simply the beginning. An idea must be communicated; a case must be made; and ultimately other people must be persuaded to get onboard. Michael Carducci brings a fascinating background to this webinar. He’s a technologist and regularly works to help senior leaders improve their results. He’s also a professional mentalist and has been a student of psychology, human behavior and the principles of influence for nearly two decades.

The moral side of cloud-based data science

David Linthicum

Consider sports betting. Today, many bettors use known and published statistics, mathematical models, and other relatively primitive tools. The idea is to gain a small advantage. Now let’s look at the world of technology.

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How to deal with cloud complexity

David Linthicum

Cloud complexity is the number one reason enterprises experience failures with cloud. Cloud-based platforms become complex due to an excess of heterogeneity and fewer common services. The end result is negative cloud computing value.

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More security partitions is always a good idea

David Linthicum

I’m often taken aback by the lack of granularity when it comes to security identity management.

3 tips for container devops in the cloud

David Linthicum

Devops in the cloud is all the rage.

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Schema Evolution Patterns

Speaker: Alex Rasmussen, CEO, Bits on Disk

If you want to make your development team squirm, ask them about database schema changes or API versioning. Most development teams struggle with changing database schemas and updating API versions without breaking existing code. Alex Rasmussen is an expert in helping teams through these struggles. His talk will examine database schema changes and API versioning as two instances of schema evolution: how your systems respond when the structure of your structured data changes.

What your cloud provider doesn’t want you to know

David Linthicum

Cloud architecture is practiced differently, depending on who you work for or with. Given that the cloud architect gig encompasses planning, design, technology selection, technology integration, and deployment planning, the overall cloud architecture itself is often somehow overlooked.

Cloud architecture that avoids risk and complexity

David Linthicum

One of the truisms about cloud architecture is that there are typically 100x100 architecture solution patterns. They all work, but only one is the right solution. If your head is swimming, let me explain. Indeed, many technology stacks and approaches will solve the same problems using cloud-based technologies.

Cloud architects need to deal with cloudops

David Linthicum

I’m a cloud computing architect. I get to draw impressive diagrams, meet with cloud providers, pick security approaches and technology, deal with governance, and then turn the whole thing over to other people to actually do the work. Nice work if you can get it.

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Cloud architects who earn $150,000 are likely underpaid

David Linthicum

According to this source, “cloud architects earn between $140,000 and $150,000” per year. I’ve paid more and less, depending on where the architect lives. However, a good cloud architect can make as much as $250,000 with proper experience and a proven track record of success. Many may scoff at “proven track record” because cloud-based resources are relatively new, and configuring those resources to form the optimum solution is a still-evolving science.

Team Leadership in the Age of Agile

Speaker: Roy Osherove, Technology and Leadership Consultant

Why is implementing new frameworks, from SCRUM to self-organized teams, so much harder than understanding them? Roy Osherove has the solution. Tune in and learn to recognize what state your team is in, to support them accordingly, and to help them adopt the best practices given where they are today.

Fix your cloud security

David Linthicum

I found some interesting statistics in this RedLock article that illustrate the severity of the cloud security problem: Only 7 percent of businesses have good visibility of all critical data, and 58 percent say they only have slight visibility. ForcePoint ).

More secrets your cloud provider doesn’t want you to know

David Linthicum

In the previous post I talked about cost reduction plays that can lower your cloud computing bill, as well as make better use of existing database licenses. Each tip will save you money and put less in your cloud provider’s pockets. Here are the next two “secrets” to consider.

Don’t wait up for the open cloud

David Linthicum

The “open cloud” is often tossed out as the savior for cloud computing in general. Of course, there is nothing to save. Public cloud usage is exploding by any measure. However, we are challenged by proprietary, or less open, public clouds that lead to lock-in.

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When serverless is a bad idea

David Linthicum

Simply put, serverless systems remove you from having to deal with infrastructure issues, such as storage and compute server provisioning or operations. Indeed, many refer to serverless as “no-ops,” but it’s really “reduced-ops,” or as my friend Mike Kavis likes to say, “some-ops.”

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Architect Your Organization for Effectiveness, Productivity, and Joy

Speaker: Ron Lichty, Consultant: Interim VP Engineering, Ron Lichty Consulting, Inc.

As a senior software leader, you likely spend more time working on the architecture of your systems than the architecture of your organization. Yet, structuring our teams and organizations is a critical factor for success. In fact, the impact of software architecture parallels the impact of organizational structure. We are excited to welcome Ron Lichty, co-author of a seminal book on managing software teams and a well-known speaker, he’ll speak to organizing for effectiveness, productivity and joy.

The human side of cloud migration

David Linthicum

The organization must change around the use of cloud computing. This is a fact that most won’t dispute. How it changes, and what changes, is where the conflict begins. Keep in mind that we’re not simply replacing on-premises servers with virtual ones in the cloud.

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The cloud is the greener way to go

David Linthicum

I live in Northern Virginia, near Ashburn. If you’ve ever driven down the Greenway, the toll road through Ashburn, you’ll get an idea of the number of data centers in town—hundreds, with more being built each year. Is this the fault of cloud computing?

Be prepared for microservices challenges

David Linthicum

Last week I wrote about how containers are becoming popular attack targets both inside and outside of a public cloud. This week let’s drill down on a common byproduct of containers: microservices. Microservices is both an architecture and a way of deploying applications. Indeed, microservices is a term used to describe the practice of breaking up an application, within a container or not, into a series of smaller specialized parts.

Private clouds are dead—but there’s an afterlife

David Linthicum

Traditional private clouds are on their way out. I’m talking about the open standards-based stuff that was huge a couple of years, but fell behind in features or functions compared to the public cloud providers.

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Best Practices for Micro-Services Management, Traceability and Visualization

Speaker: Robert Starmer, Cloud Advisor, Founding Partner at Kumulus Technologies

Moving to micro-services, or even working with distributed applications in a traditional environment, brings with it a host of interactions that are often difficult to understand. This session will provide an overview of service mesh, a review of the Istio service mesh itself, and dive into best practices and integration models for integrating the traceability model into a distributed application.

3 reasons to put ERP in the cloud

David Linthicum

ERP systems are the last strongholds of processes and data that enterprise IT refuses to move to the cloud. ERP holds most of the relevant business data, and without that data the business would not exist. Thus, many companies are delaying migrating ERP to the cloud or refusing altogether.

Your 3-minute guide to serverless success

David Linthicum

The serverless architecture market was estimated at $4.25 billion in 2018 and is expected to reach $14.93 billion by 2023, according to analyst firm Markets and Markets. What has propelled the use of serverless?

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It's time to change your cloud operating model

David Linthicum

Enterprises need to change workflows and internal processes around the use of public cloud computing. There, I said it. Organizations understand that the cloud has a huge impact on how they work. This includes the ability to improve agility and efficiency. Cloud computing can be adopted in ways that are most productive for the business. The process of defining the future state of workflows and organizational behavior around the use of cloud computing is called a “cloud operating model.”

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Data centers can learn sustainability from the cloud

David Linthicum

Everyone wants a green data center, also known as a sustainable data center. There are both policy and technology pushes in this emerging space, such as countries that are encouraging voluntary reduction of a data center’s carbon footprint. For instance, Finland will be announcing a lower energy tax for data centers that show a certain degree of greenness. The big advantage of having data centers in colder climates is that not as much power is needed for cooling.

Fend off the increasing container attacks in the cloud

David Linthicum

The computer security company Skybox Security released an update to its 2019 Vulnerability and Threat Trends report. As the name implies, this report analyzes the computer vulnerabilities in play during the first half of 2019. Some of the key findings included the rapid growth of vulnerabilities in cloud containers.

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