David Linthicum

The moral side of cloud-based data science

David Linthicum

Consider sports betting. Today, many bettors use known and published statistics, mathematical models, and other relatively primitive tools. The idea is to gain a small advantage. Now let’s look at the world of technology.

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3 tips for container devops in the cloud

David Linthicum

Devops in the cloud is all the rage.

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What your cloud provider doesn’t want you to know

David Linthicum

Cloud architecture is practiced differently, depending on who you work for or with. Given that the cloud architect gig encompasses planning, design, technology selection, technology integration, and deployment planning, the overall cloud architecture itself is often somehow overlooked.

3 reasons to put ERP in the cloud

David Linthicum

ERP systems are the last strongholds of processes and data that enterprise IT refuses to move to the cloud. ERP holds most of the relevant business data, and without that data the business would not exist. Thus, many companies are delaying migrating ERP to the cloud or refusing altogether.

Schema Evolution Patterns

Speaker: Alex Rasmussen, CEO, Bits on Disk

If you want to make your development team squirm, ask them about database schema changes or API versioning. Most development teams struggle with changing database schemas and updating API versions without breaking existing code. Alex Rasmussen is an expert in helping teams through these struggles. His talk will examine database schema changes and API versioning as two instances of schema evolution: how your systems respond when the structure of your structured data changes.

How to deal with cloud complexity

David Linthicum

Cloud complexity is the number one reason enterprises experience failures with cloud. Cloud-based platforms become complex due to an excess of heterogeneity and fewer common services. The end result is negative cloud computing value.

How To 193

Fix your cloud security

David Linthicum

I found some interesting statistics in this RedLock article that illustrate the severity of the cloud security problem: Only 7 percent of businesses have good visibility of all critical data, and 58 percent say they only have slight visibility. ForcePoint ).

More secrets your cloud provider doesn’t want you to know

David Linthicum

In the previous post I talked about cost reduction plays that can lower your cloud computing bill, as well as make better use of existing database licenses. Each tip will save you money and put less in your cloud provider’s pockets. Here are the next two “secrets” to consider.

Cloud architects need to deal with cloudops

David Linthicum

I’m a cloud computing architect. I get to draw impressive diagrams, meet with cloud providers, pick security approaches and technology, deal with governance, and then turn the whole thing over to other people to actually do the work. Nice work if you can get it.

.Net 221

Don’t wait up for the open cloud

David Linthicum

The “open cloud” is often tossed out as the savior for cloud computing in general. Of course, there is nothing to save. Public cloud usage is exploding by any measure. However, we are challenged by proprietary, or less open, public clouds that lead to lock-in.

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Team Leadership in the Age of Agile

Speaker: Roy Osherove, Technology and Leadership Consultant

Why is implementing new frameworks, from SCRUM to self-organized teams, so much harder than understanding them? Roy Osherove has the solution. Tune in and learn to recognize what state your team is in, to support them accordingly, and to help them adopt the best practices given where they are today.

When serverless is a bad idea

David Linthicum

Simply put, serverless systems remove you from having to deal with infrastructure issues, such as storage and compute server provisioning or operations. Indeed, many refer to serverless as “no-ops,” but it’s really “reduced-ops,” or as my friend Mike Kavis likes to say, “some-ops.”

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The human side of cloud migration

David Linthicum

The organization must change around the use of cloud computing. This is a fact that most won’t dispute. How it changes, and what changes, is where the conflict begins. Keep in mind that we’re not simply replacing on-premises servers with virtual ones in the cloud.

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3 steps to solving disaster recovery in the cloud

David Linthicum

Many believe that DR (disaster recovery) is built into the cloud. It’s not. Although many cloud providers do a fair job of making sure you can recover your data, you could be missing out on the capabilities that truly define a DR system.

Top 3 cloud migration mistakes: summer 2019 version

David Linthicum

If you’re in the process of migrating workloads to the cloud, chances are this is not your first rodeo. Most of those doing cloud migrations are on their second or third project. Just when you would think we’re becoming more experienced, we’re also seeing an increase in migration failures.

The Six Principles of Persuasion

Speaker: Michael Carducci, Tech Leader, VUE Expert, and Full Stack Developer

As senior tech leaders, we often fall prey to thinking that a “good idea” and logical case is sufficient to get the desired response and result. We might be trying to get our CEO on-board with investment in a new technology or a rearchitecture effort, or we might want culture or process changes by our team. Our “good idea” is simply the beginning. An idea must be communicated; a case must be made; and ultimately other people must be persuaded to get onboard. Michael Carducci brings a fascinating background to this webinar. He’s a technologist and regularly works to help senior leaders improve their results. He’s also a professional mentalist and has been a student of psychology, human behavior and the principles of influence for nearly two decades.

Private clouds are dead—but there’s an afterlife

David Linthicum

Traditional private clouds are on their way out. I’m talking about the open standards-based stuff that was huge a couple of years, but fell behind in features or functions compared to the public cloud providers.

Your 3-minute guide to serverless success

David Linthicum

The serverless architecture market was estimated at $4.25 billion in 2018 and is expected to reach $14.93 billion by 2023, according to analyst firm Markets and Markets. What has propelled the use of serverless?

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3 things about cloud and IoT you need to consider

David Linthicum

The internet of things (IoT) and cloud-based providers are bound at the hip. That said, most people don’t understand how, why, or what to expect. I’ve been asked some good questions that drove me to do some research and testing. Perhaps the answers are of interest to you as well. Do you store the data in the cloud or the IoT device? This depends on a lot of things, but I have two rules of thumb: [ InfoWorld explains: What is multicloud? The next step in cloud computing. |

The case for “stepping stone” private clouds

David Linthicum

Public cloud providers surprised a great deal of people when they came out with proprietary private clouds. That’s where actual hardware and software support a subset of public cloud services.)

Best Practices for Micro-Services Management, Traceability and Visualization

Speaker: Robert Starmer, Cloud Advisor, Founding Partner at Kumulus Technologies

Moving to micro-services, or even working with distributed applications in a traditional environment, brings with it a host of interactions that are often difficult to understand. This session will provide an overview of service mesh, a review of the Istio service mesh itself, and dive into best practices and integration models for integrating the traceability model into a distributed application.

How to address IoT’s two biggest challenges: data and security

David Linthicum

You don’t even need to Google “data growth and IoT” to see the trend for the internet of things; all research shows a steep curve up and to the right. The reason is pretty simple: We’re collectively trying to capture fine-grained, ongoing, machine-generated data from a fast-growing universe of devices because the more data, the better the analyses are possible from that data. At the same time, it’s clear that security for IoT mostly takes a backseat to everything else.

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Why your cloudops staff is quitting

David Linthicum

It’s Monday morning and you have another letter of resignation on your desk. This time from a woman who was doing performance monitoring and cloud-system tuning. Last week it was a database operations administrator, and two more from the cloudops team quit the week before. What happened?

Why you likely don’t need an internal cloud broker

David Linthicum

You need a public cloud-based relational database to support a new application. You submit a request, not directly to a specific cloud provider, but to an internal cloud broker.

What you should know about serverless computing before you start

David Linthicum

Are you considering serverless computing ? So is everyone else in IT. A recent survey released by New Stack reveals that half of IT executives in the survey say they are already running with a serverless architecture, and 28 percent intend to do so within the next 18 months. The survey of 608 companies found that benefits among serverless users include scalability and a greater speed of development.

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AI cloudops is coming, whether you like it or not

David Linthicum

As someone who’s worked with AI for the last 30 years (yes, it was a thing 30 years ago), I’ve often thought of its capabilities were overrated and used for the wrong things in many cases. Now that it’s cheap thanks to cloud computing, and much more effective thanks to the pace of innovation, AI as a solution is coming up again, including the use in cloud operations.

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Do we need to care about cloud performance?

David Linthicum

Performance issues went away after we migrated our applications and data sets to the cloud, right? That has not been the case. Here’s just a few examples of why. . Most performance issues are traceable back to the application and to the hard fact that the applications must be redesigned and rebuilt to deal with the problem. Database response time is a frequent performance issue and often requires a redesign or even an entire change of the database model.

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Balance tactical with strategic when thinking cloud

David Linthicum

It’s always been an issue—those who look at IT architecture as something that exists to serve a single application or small systems domain. These days many organizations fail to select a cloud technology to serve enterprise IT as a whole. They deal with a series of tactical application cases that all have one-off cloud architectures. Do that 20 to 30 times, and you’ll have a real problem. The result is predictable.

3 signs you’re going overboard with cloud features

David Linthicum

I’ve been working with new trendy tech for years, and one of the things that’s been driving me crazy is not the speed at which things move but the fact that my clients want to keep up at any cost. There are several new features (aka cloud services) that are announced or released from public cloud providers monthly, not just at their user conferences: new database services, new AI services, new blockchain services, new serverless services, new container services.

Who will benefit the most from 5G

David Linthicum

The growth of 5G cellular technology has gotten a lot of people excited, including those who are looking for 5G to provide a larger market for cloud computing, and most important, to simplify both connectivity and security. The question is: Who will have the most to gain? Enterprises that consume 5G? The cloud computing providers? The telecommunications companies that sell 5G?

What cloud computing can learn from good BBQ

David Linthicum

You can’t beat good BBQ. As long as I’ve been eating, I’ve loved the taste of BBQ cooked correctly, and I’ve loved the science of getting BBQ right, no matter brisket, ribs, pulled pork, or chicken. Vegans may want to sit this blog out.) What’s clear to me is that the process and ingredients that it takes to make your cloud computing project work are directly related to how you get a perfectly smoked piece of meat. Here’s a bit of advice about both. InfoWorld explains: What is multicloud?

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Why cloud computing suddenly seems so hard and expensive

David Linthicum

A survey of 100 IT decision-makers in companies with 500 or more employees conducted by NetEnrich found that 85 percent claimed either moderate or extensive production use of cloud infrastructure. What’s not surprising, and what I’ve been saying here, 80 percent stated that they have moved at least a quarter of all workloads to the public cloud. But there is trouble in paradise.

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2 big mistakes to avoid in edge computing

David Linthicum

More things are being pushed to the edge. Think of the edge as the space between the cloud and whatever device or system is tossing off data. The idea is to do most of the processing at the edge, close to where the data is produced. This approach, called edge computing , provides a much better response time, because there’s no need to send the data back to a central cloud-based data-storage system where it’s processed and then returned all the way back to the device. What is cloud computing?

Cloud for healthcare: Avoid these 2 pain points

David Linthicum

The global healthcare cloud computing market is estimated to grow at a compound annual growth rate around 14 % from 2019 to 2026. If you’ve done the math, that puts the market value around USD $40 billion by 2026. When it came to whole industries closing their eyes to the rise of cloud computing, healthcare companies once comprised my biggest group of deniers. Most would not even take meetings, even though the scary public cloud held previously unattainable solutions for them.

Avoid these 2 cloud computing career pitfalls

David Linthicum

People come to me all of the time looking to reengineer their IT career with a cloud computing makeover. While this is typically a good move, I find that as the world of cloud computing becomes more complex, those looking to get higher-paying cloud computing jobs are making some wrong calls. Here’s two of the most common. Mistake No. 1: Going too wide. I’ve often explained the benefit of being a jack of all trades, and master of some to people wanting to become a cloud computing architect.

Now is the time to get serious about your cloud strategy

David Linthicum

IT loves its enterprise data centers. Who can blame IT? Data centers are LED light works of modern art these days. Indeed, I like visiting data centers just to enjoy how they are designed and watch the lights blink. The move away from enterprise data centers has been less aggressive than predicted. It seems that many applications and data sets can’t live anywhere else according to enterprise IT, and while cloud computing is an option, IT views it as a tactical solution. [