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The LAN: A History of Network Operating Systems Part 10

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In the past, if we wished to attach some other random LAN to this system, we typically needed a gateway to perform protocol conversion from whatever the LAN was using (assuming that it was not running the same DECnet protocol) to the DECnet protocols.

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The LAN: A History of Network Operating Systems Part 6

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Token Ring) LANs resulting in the capture of a much larger market share." These conclusions were largely based on assumptions, at the time, that growth in the marketplace will come largely in LANs based on international standards. In 1987 it was said, "throughout the 1990s we should anticipate that there will be a growth in 802.3

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The LAN: A History of Network Operating Systems Part 3

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Even though the earliest LANs were of this genre, by 1989 it appeared that they were on the way out. We will take a close look at peer-to-peer LANs at a deeper level in some future posts.

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The LAN: A History of Network Operating Systems Part 12

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the network system calls then provided under interrupt 21H gave all suppliers of network software the capability to standardize at least some of the access to LAN hardware. Most manufacturers of LAN software had announced or implemented support of NETBIOS for IBM LANs. When DOS was extended in Version 3.1,

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The LAN: A History of Network Operating Systems Part 11

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The NETwork Basic Input Output System (NET-BIOS) was introduced at the same time IBM announced the PC Network in 1984. The network microcode was the foundation for program control of the IBM LANs; it resides in ROM on the Adapter Card, on diskette, or on the PC's motherboard.

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The LAN: A History of Network Operating Systems Part 7

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The fileservers were usually high-performance PCs running under some operating system that allows multiple activities to take place concurrently. Two approaches have been taken by NOS manufacturers:

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The LAN: A History Network Operating Systems Part 1

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Under the best of circumstances, the end-user should not even know that a network exists. If he wishes to do something simple, like copy a file from one place to another, it should be possible to use something like the old MS/DOS copy command and simply type: COPY c:mydata.dat p:yourdata.dat.